We the People, Not We the Corporations

On January 21, 2010, with its ruling in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, the Supreme Court ruled that corporations are persons, entitled by the U.S. Constitution to buy elections and run our government. Human beings are people; corporations are legal fictions.

We, the People of the United States of America, reject the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in Citizens United and other related cases, and move to amend our Constitution to firmly establish that money is not speech, and that human beings, not corporations, are persons entitled to constitutional rights.

The Supreme Court is misguided in principle, and wrong on the law. In a democracy, the people rule.

We Move to Amend.

". . . corporations have no consciences, no beliefs, no feelings, no thoughts, no desires. Corporations help structure and facilitate the activities of human beings, to be sure, and their 'personhood' often serves as a useful legal fiction. But they are not themselves members of “We the People” by whom and for whom our Constitution was established."

             ~Supreme Court Justice Stevens, January 2010

Announcements

Legalizing Democracy: The Right to Vote vs. Corporate Rights

May 15, 2017

From the Jim Crow style laws of the late 1800's which used literacy tests, poll taxes, and other more sinister methods to bar African Americans from voting, to women's suffrage, which wasn't achieved until 1920--less than 100 years ago--the people's so-called right to vote has only been expanded upon demand by a vibrant social movement.

In an effort to establish the right to vote as an indistinguishable feature of American democracy, FairVote, a non-profit committed to grassroots coalition building to create a more fair and accurate depiction of a real democracy, is behind a right to vote amendment in Congress, House Joint Resolution 74. To stop the continued debate over voting laws by states that each have their own rules and policies, many of which deliberately disenfranchise certain groups, this must-pass amendment declares, once and for all, that every US citizen has the right to vote.
 
Move to Amend supports FairVote and this amendment as part of a larger strategy to legalize democracy.

Do #You Move to Amend?

May 10, 2017

Does corporate personhood piss you off? If it does, you're not alone, I'm right there with you and so are many, many, many others! Today marks the 131st anniversary of Santa Clara County vs. Southern Pacific Railroad and the "birth" of corporate personhood. To highlight this important case, we are launching the #IMoveToAmend campaign.  

Our goal is to gain 50 new monthly sustainers by the end of May. We hope that you can help us reach our goal by becoming a Move To Amend monthly sustainer, today.

April 2017 Move to Amend Live Report

April 26, 2017

Welcome to our monthly livestream, the Move to Amend Live Report! This is the space where we bring you a live look into what’s going down inside the movement to amend the Constitution and legalize democracy. Check out the video recording below to learn the highlights from April and what's coming up in May. 

Remember to join us on Facebook LIVE each month on the 4th Wednesday at 5pm Pacific/8pm Eastern on the Move to Amend Facebook Page to get the latest news, ask questions, and get involved!

Don't use Facebook? You can also tune in the day after to view the recording right here on our website, or via our YouTube channel.

Corporations used racism to destroy the middle class and turn the US into a developing nation

April 24, 2017

In a new book, “The Vanishing Middle Class: Prejudice and Power in a Dual Economy,” Peter Temin, professor emeritus of economics at MIT, draws a portrait of the new reality in a way that is frighteningly, indelibly clear: America is not one country anymore. It is becoming two, each with vastly different resources, expectations and fates.

John Deere just told the copyright office that only corporations can own property, humans can only license it

April 22, 2017

As software eats the world, it's devouring the idea of private property -- "that sole and despotic dominion which one man claims and exercises over the external things of the world, in total exclusion of the right of any other individual in the universe."

The fact that the DMCA felonizes bypassing copyright locks, combined with the proliferation of copyrighted software in gadgets means that companies can turn their commercial preferences into private laws. Just design your gadget so that using is in any way apart from the official, prescribed way requires breaking a copyright lock. Now, anyone who violates your license terms is also committing a felony, punishable by five years in prison and a $500,000 fine.

For a first offense.