Minnesota Press Coverage

Mr. Moneybags visits Cloquet!

September 10, 2013

Mr. Moneybags, originally created for the Twin Cities Occupy the Courts event in January, 2011, has been on the move spreading the Move to Amend message! He was last seen at the Labor Day Parade in Cloquet where he attracted lots of attention and front-page press coverage!

Rumor has it Mr. Moneybags will be trying to buy influence at the Twin Cities MTA garage sale on September 14 and, since his audaciousness knows no bounds, he is geared up for an appearance at parade in Plymouth on September 28 where he will try to buy votes.

 

Crowd gathers in Edina to oppose Citizens United ruling

August 21, 2012

The audience of 75 people applauded as David Cobb began, “I’m a patriotic, and these days, pissed off American citizen.”

Cobb, a former Green Party presidential candidate, called for the crowd gathered at Good Samaritan United Methodist Church in Edina to take action in supporting the addition of a 28th amendment to the U.S. Constitution that would state a corporation isn’t a person and money donated to candidates isn’t protected free speech.

Corporations and People

October 10, 2011

The conventional criticism of the Occupy Wall Street movement – that it is long on complaints about income inequality, but short on proposed remedies – may need revision.

A number of “occupations,” including ones in Minnesota, have latched onto a constitutional amendment proposal that would deny corporations legal status as persons with full First Amendment rights.

“End corporate personhood” is their slogan. It’s been popping up lately on signs and banners at the Occupy MN encampment at Hennepin County Government Center and elsewhere around the country.

Target Donation Dispute Fades, But New Controversy Over Corporate Contributions Certain in 2012 Elections

April 29, 2011

Ten months ago, as the 2010 governor's race began to heat up with the Minnesota summer, Target Corp. contributed $150,000 in company funds to MN Forward, a business-backed independent expenditure group.

To CEO Gregg Steinhafel, who seems to have made the decision to donate the cash, it must have seemed harmless enough.

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