We the People, Not We the Corporations


On January 21, 2010, with its ruling in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, the Supreme Court ruled that corporations are persons, entitled by the U.S. Constitution to buy elections and run our government. Human beings are people; corporations are legal fictions.

We, the People of the United States of America, reject the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in Citizens United and other related cases, and move to amend our Constitution to firmly establish that money is not speech, and that human beings, not corporations, are persons entitled to constitutional rights.

The Supreme Court is misguided in principle, and wrong on the law. In a democracy, the people rule.

We Move to Amend.

". . . corporations have no consciences, no beliefs, no feelings, no thoughts, no desires. Corporations help structure and facilitate the activities of human beings, to be sure, and their 'personhood' often serves as a useful legal fiction. But they are not themselves members of “We the People” by whom and for whom our Constitution was established."

             ~Supreme Court Justice Stevens, January 2010



Move to Amend Reports on the Rights of Communities and Rights of Nature

December 3, 2015

Move to Amend brings you voices from the movement to amend the Constitution through our weekly podcast. Every Thursday at 7am Pacific / 10am Eastern.

Have you ever tried to ban fracking in your community, or tried to raise the minimum wage, only to find out that your community has no freedom to protect itself or your environment? Movement Rights co-founder Shannon Biggs describes ways to fight back against corporate power in your own communities in this episode of Move to Amend Reports.

Move to Amend Reports on Journalism, Whistleblowers, and the Military-Industrial Complex

November 19, 2015

Move to Amend brings you voices from the movement to amend the Constitution through our weekly podcast. Every Thursday at 7am Pacific / 10am Eastern.

Don’t miss the conclusion of our enlightening two-part discussion with one of the country’s foremost independent journalists and anti-war activists, Norman Solomon, as he talks with us about how the connections between journalism, corporations, and the military-industrial complex will shape the future of democracy and the fates of whistleblowers exposing corruption.

Tackling Corporate Power Head-On: The Urgency Of Fixing Our Democracy

November 17, 2015

We can make it clear that money is not speech, and that Congress and the States have the right to regulate spending in elections. We can make it clear that corporations are not people, and have no constitutional rights to finance elections or to overrule democratic legislation and regulations. We need to restore the rights of Congress and the States to regulate spending on elections, and the only way to do that, short of a new Court, is through a constitutional amendment.

Time to Raise Hell!

November 13, 2015

Although numerous organizations and individuals numbering in the hundreds of thousands have expressed their opposition to the TPP, a deal was reached on October 5 and the full details released on November 5.  

Reframing Campaign Finance as a Civil Rights Issue

Speaking at a recent forum on campaign finance as a civil rights issue, Nicole Austin-Hillery of the Brennan Center for Justice urged reform advocates to speak about money in politics in terms ordinary people can understand. (Image is a still from the video below.)
November 10, 2015

To help build the movement addressing the problem of big money in politics, reformers need to reframe the issue in a way that engages voters by emphasizing issues that affect their daily lives. That was the message from an Oct. 15 forum in Durham, North Carolina titled "Money in Politics as a Civil Rights Issue" that brought together a panel of elected officials, legal scholars and reform advocates.

Reformers should articulate "campaign finance as the problem of political participation," said Professor Guy-Uriel Charles, founding director of the Center on Law, Race and Politics at the Duke University School of Law in Durham. "[Campaign finance] is a civil rights problem."