We the People, Not We the Corporations

 

On January 21, 2010, with its ruling in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, the Supreme Court ruled that corporations are persons, entitled by the U.S. Constitution to buy elections and run our government. Human beings are people; corporations are legal fictions.

We, the People of the United States of America, reject the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in Citizens United and other related cases, and move to amend our Constitution to firmly establish that money is not speech, and that human beings, not corporations, are persons entitled to constitutional rights.

The Supreme Court is misguided in principle, and wrong on the law. In a democracy, the people rule.

We Move to Amend.

". . . corporations have no consciences, no beliefs, no feelings, no thoughts, no desires. Corporations help structure and facilitate the activities of human beings, to be sure, and their 'personhood' often serves as a useful legal fiction. But they are not themselves members of “We the People” by whom and for whom our Constitution was established."

             ~Supreme Court Justice Stevens, January 2010

 

Announcements

Sept 3 Conference Call: Why Non-Profits and Unions Should Support Ending Corporate Constitutional Rights

September 2, 2015

Have you ever wondered what the implications are of ending corporate constitutional rights for unions and non-profits? Tune in on September 3 to get the low-down on this conference call with Kaitlin Sopoci-Belknap and David Cobb of Move to Amend and Ron Fein of Free Speech for People. You'll have the chance to ask questions. Limited to 250 participants.

Now That We’re Talking About Citizenship, Let’s Revoke Corporate Personhood

August 27, 2015

Thanks to Donald Trump and Jeb Bush, the media is now entertaining discussion on the idea of revoking citizenship for human beings, to the point where the media iscalculating the cost of these insane and unconstitutional proposals. If Trump wants to revoke the citizenship of people who are using up all of our resources and not paying taxes, and if the media really wants to have the conversation, let’s start with multinational corporations.

Court's Bloody Joke Benefits Corporations While Others Suffer

August 26, 2015

When Mitt Romney declared that “corporations are people” at the Iowa State Fair four years ago, there were quite a few chuckles in the crowd. However, as a new courtdecision has shown, it is no laughing matter that federal courts are increasingly holding the same view.

The latest win for Big Business came in a case against the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). The SEC had mandated that companies disclose whether their products were free of “conflict minerals.”

The Myth of Community Rights: Self-Governance has a Corporate Ceiling

August 20, 2015

Even as hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) has spread rapidly in communities across the United States, there’s a sense that communities are gaining traction to stem this tide. But the reality on the ground—despite news headlines—says otherwise.

For example, in New York in 2014, the state’s highest court ruled that communities could use local zoning ordinances to ban hydraulic fracturing for shale gas. Six months earlier, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court overturned a state law that stripped zoning authority away from communities regarding the siting of gas wells. And in Kentucky, the state Supreme Court ruled that a pipeline corporation couldn’t use eminent domain authority to take private property for a pipeline carrying frack gas through the state.

While on the surface it may look like the courts are finally beginning to fix the power imbalance between energy corporations and communities, the basic relationship between corporations and communities remains untouched by these rulings.