Press Coverage

Greg Coleridge - Activist, Move To Amend

July 19, 2017

"The problem isn't that the government is broken," Greg Coleridge says, whipping out one of many activist slogans he's been repeating so long they're inextricably threaded into the fabric of his speech. "It's that it's fixed."  

"Fixed as in rigged," he says, leaning in, making sure the message is clear. Coleridge's central issue is corporate power and the insidious effects of money in politics. He is a man who has known that corporations aren't people since long before Citizens United.

Call for Congress to Overturn "Citizens United" Through Amendment Picks Up Steam

June 9, 2017

Late last month, Nevada became the 19th state to call for Congress to overturn the Supreme Court's Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission decision. This would be accomplished through a constitutional amendment process. Since the 2010 ruling, its results have been overwhelmingly evident: The decision has substantially increased the influence of corporations on elections.

Corporate personhood should be our prime target

February 6, 2017

I’ve been musing about the idea of corporate personhood — the campaign by Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts and others that would grant corporations the basic rights that people have, on the theory that “businesses are, at least legally, not that different from people."

It is this kind of thinking that should be the primary target of people and organizations who want to bring humanity, not money, back to the fore as the ruling force in this country.

Why Are We So Powerless?

December 4, 2016

As would be expected, commentators have been busy analyzing this year’s election results, with writers and talking heads attributing Donald Trump’s surprising victory to an array of different factors: a flawed Electoral College system, the shortcomings and tactical errors

It passed overwhelmingly in Montana and Colorado, and now activists want Californians to speak on money in politics

November 3, 2016

It’s not easy to overturn a U.S. Supreme Court decision. Congress can’t do it alone, and unless the court reverses itself, the only other avenue is changing the Constitution.

For national groups hoping to overturn the 2010 Citizens United decision that altered how much corporations can spend on politics, they know it’ll be a slow, state-by-state slog they hope passes through California when voters consider Proposition 59 on Tuesday.

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